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Centre for Experimental Medicine

Centre for Experimental Medicine queens university architect scienceCentre for Experimental Medicine queens university architect scienceCentre for Experimental Medicine queens university architect scienceCentre for Experimental Medicine queens university architect scienceCentre for Experimental Medicine queens university architect scienceCentre for Experimental Medicine queens university architect scienceCentre for Experimental Medicine queens university architect scienceCentre for Experimental Medicine queens university architect scienceCentre for Experimental Medicine queens university architect scienceCentre for Experimental Medicine queens university architect science

The new building is based on the provision of generic bio-medical science labs, with the ability to allow the building to be adapted to suit the changing requirements and numbers of lab spaces and support areas in the future. The new CEM building will reach out to the wider campus, encouraging interaction not just through the research teams but also those working in adjacent facilities. It will attract the best researchers from across the world.

The proposal is a result of careful coordination between architectural, structural and services design, and supports a passive environmental approach for the large volume atrium spaces, and efficient and flexible solution for the lab environment and through renewable energy strategy will result in achieving a significant reduction in carbon emissions and running costs for the new building.

Research laboratories energy consumption per square foot typically exceeds that of a hospital by a factor of two—and general academic and office buildings by a factor of five. They also use disproportionate amounts of water and have a substantial waste stream, some of it toxic. The CVVS design has overcome these challenges and has achieved an ‘Excellent’ BREEAM rating an EPC rating of below 40 and air tightness rating of less than 3 m 3 /h/m 2 @ 50 Pa.

Renewable and low carbon technologies such as ground source heat pumps, wind turbines, photovoltaic panels, solar water heating panels are being matched with a high efficiency gas boiler. A double skin façade has been employed to increase the energy efficiency of the building by enhancing thermal values and preheat air for the HVAC system.

All major ductwork rises within the double skin to the plant room on the roof which allows for a clear floor plate internally for flexibility.

Contract Value: £20 million
Project Status: Completed